The developers of the widely used setup tools also embraced the new technology and started to offer new versions of their tools to create setup programs of this nature. However, as the experience of many developers shows, while these tools are perfectly capable of creating simpler installation packages, they often prove too limiting, inflexible when it comes to more complex requirements.

Wix is the world’s most popular website design platform. It serves over 110 million people in 190 countries, with 45,000 new sign-ups every day. Looking to join them? Our step-by-step guide will show you how to use Wix, and just how easy it is to get started. So if you’re wondering how to create a Wix website that’ll impress every visitor, it’s totally doable – as a drag-and-drop website editor, Wix is super easy to learn and use.


Traditional setup tools used a programmatic, script-based approach to describe the various steps involved in the deployment of the application to be installed on the target machine: files to be copied, registry settings to be created, device drivers and services to be started. The technology behind Windows Installer, while it maintains a comparable look and feel for the end user, underwent important philosophical changes. The fundamental change was to move from the imperative description to a declarative one: rather than to describe the individual steps of installation, the declarative form specifies the state the target machine should be left in after various phases of installation and uninstallation. While the imperative description seems to be quite sufficient until some error occurs, the declarative one makes it possible to cope with unexpected conditions, differing target machine environments, aborted installations, shared resources. It is of paramount importance for setup developers to make sure that whatever happens during the process, the target machine should be left in a known, stable state, without introducing any detrimental side effects.
Traditional setup tools used a programmatic, script-based approach to describe the various steps involved in the deployment of the application to be installed on the target machine: files to be copied, registry settings to be created, device drivers and services to be started. The technology behind Windows Installer, while it maintains a comparable look and feel for the end user, underwent important philosophical changes. The fundamental change was to move from the imperative description to a declarative one: rather than to describe the individual steps of installation, the declarative form specifies the state the target machine should be left in after various phases of installation and uninstallation. While the imperative description seems to be quite sufficient until some error occurs, the declarative one makes it possible to cope with unexpected conditions, differing target machine environments, aborted installations, shared resources. It is of paramount importance for setup developers to make sure that whatever happens during the process, the target machine should be left in a known, stable state, without introducing any detrimental side effects.
Topic clusters involve changing your website structure to have single “pillar” pages acting as primary hubs of information. From this hub, each subtopic (or cluster) has its own page connected via link. Think of it like spokes on a wheel. Every piece of cluster content connects back to the hub, with the pillar page providing the primary anchor point for navigation.

Wix is the world’s most popular website design platform. It serves over 110 million people in 190 countries, with 45,000 new sign-ups every day. Looking to join them? Our step-by-step guide will show you how to use Wix, and just how easy it is to get started. So if you’re wondering how to create a Wix website that’ll impress every visitor, it’s totally doable – as a drag-and-drop website editor, Wix is super easy to learn and use.
The WiX Toolset is a set of tools that build Windows installation packages from XML source code. The toolset provides both a command line environment that developers may either integrate into their oldstyle Makefile build processes or use the newer MSBuild technology from inside integrated development environments like Microsoft Visual Studio or SharpDevelop to build their MSI and MSM setup packages.
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as a Lead Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web hosting, music, utilities, and video game copy, Jeffrey makes comic books, mentors, practices bass and Jeet Kune Do, and appears on the odd podcasts or convention panel. He also collects vinyl and greatly enjoys a craft brew. 
While the the best of them offer surprising amounts of flexibility, they also impose stringent enough restrictions to page design that you shouldn't be able to create a really bad looking site using one of these services. Typically you can get a Mysite.servicename.com style-url with no commerce abilities for free from one of these services; you have to pay extra for a better URL and the ability to sell. One issue to consider is that if you eventually outgrow one of these services, it can be hard to export your site to a full scale advanced web hosting like Dreamhost or Hostgator. If you know that's where you are eventually going, it may be better to skip the sitebuilder step.
In all Website Builder plans any data transmitted from your site will be encrypted using a SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate. Your SSL will establish an encrypted link between your web server and the browser of the person visiting your site. This means that all data will be kept private; which is important if you want visitors to your site to be safe. If you want to sell products or services in your store, you will want to have a SSL since it protects credit card and bank numbers from being intercepted by hackers.
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