In an integrated application/setup development environment, the original developer should modify the WiX source files in sync with the application development. As soon as a new module has been started, a new registry entry, service or other dependency has been coded, the appropriate setup modification should be made in parallel. Using this approach, no important information will ever be lost and, as a bonus, the setup program will be practically finished together with the application itself.
The toolset is written in C# and requires the .NET Framework to run. However, this only applies to the toolset itself. The installation packages you create with the toolset do not require any extra framework or software to be installed on the target computer. Similarly, there might be a few additional utilities required for some special applications (merge modules, patches) but only on your build computer, the client will only need the finished and self-contained installer package, nothing else.
The developers of the widely used setup tools also embraced the new technology and started to offer new versions of their tools to create setup programs of this nature. However, as the experience of many developers shows, while these tools are perfectly capable of creating simpler installation packages, they often prove too limiting, inflexible when it comes to more complex requirements.
However, this lack of creative control can be frustrating. Wix ADI is not nearly as flexible as Wix Editor, which offers smooth drag-and-drop design and easily editable text boxes. So, while you can enjoy simplicity with both Wix tools, the Wix Editor offers more freedom. It also builds more personal sites, thanks to its Premium plan upgrades and wide choice of apps.

You can make a website for free, but there are catches. Free accounts on website builders hold a lot of important features back. You can’t use custom domains, and your free site will have ads for that website builder. If you’re looking to learn more about website building then the free options are worth a look. However, if you want a professional, feature-rich website you’re going to have to pay at least a few dollars a month.


Blogs are swell, but sometimes you need a simple place to park your persona on the internet for branding purposes. In this case, you can just get a nameplate site, or as we prefer to think of them, a personal webpage (rather than a multipage site). Instead of linking internally to your store or other pages of note as you would with a more traditional web page, a personal site usually has links that go elsewhere—to your social networks, wish lists, playlists, or whatever else is linkable.
On most builders you can create your website in less than an hour. We don’t recommend being quite so quickfire about it, though. The best way to make a website is to give yourself a solid day to play around with the software and fine tune your site. It can take much longer than this to make a website site though – it depends on how many pages you have and how much customization you need to do.
I'd like to express my thanks to Rob Mensching for creating the toolset in the first place, and to Neil Sleightholm, Vadym Stetsyak, Robert Pickering, Marc Borgers, John DeSoi, Markus Karg, Greg Glass, Stefan Krüger, Nobuo Kihara, Phil Wilson, Peter Tewkesbury, Nicholas Muguira, David Adams, Mike Green, Chesong Lee and Christophe Michel for the material contributed to the tutorial.
Traditional setup tools used a programmatic, script-based approach to describe the various steps involved in the deployment of the application to be installed on the target machine: files to be copied, registry settings to be created, device drivers and services to be started. The technology behind Windows Installer, while it maintains a comparable look and feel for the end user, underwent important philosophical changes. The fundamental change was to move from the imperative description to a declarative one: rather than to describe the individual steps of installation, the declarative form specifies the state the target machine should be left in after various phases of installation and uninstallation. While the imperative description seems to be quite sufficient until some error occurs, the declarative one makes it possible to cope with unexpected conditions, differing target machine environments, aborted installations, shared resources. It is of paramount importance for setup developers to make sure that whatever happens during the process, the target machine should be left in a known, stable state, without introducing any detrimental side effects.

In all Website Builder plans any data transmitted from your site will be encrypted using a SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate. Your SSL will establish an encrypted link between your web server and the browser of the person visiting your site. This means that all data will be kept private; which is important if you want visitors to your site to be safe. If you want to sell products or services in your store, you will want to have a SSL since it protects credit card and bank numbers from being intercepted by hackers.
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