The major player in the blog game is WordPress, a content management system (CMS) that powers millions of websites, including The New York Times, Quartz, and Variety. WordPress-powered sites are incredibly easy to set up, customize, and update—ideally on a daily basis. You aren't required to learn fancy-schmancy FTP tricks (though you can certainly use them if you like), and there are ridiculous numbers of free and paid WordPress themes and WordPress plug-ins to give your website a pretty face and vastly expanded functionality. Though WordPress dominates the blogging space, it isn't the only blogging CMS of note, however.
If your template comes with images, these can be changed too. This is what makes Wix the best – you can really make the website your own, one click at a time. Don’t like an image? Click it and switch it out for something you do like. It could be a saved photo from your business, or one of Wix’s free images – there are tons of design possibilities to be explored here.

Top tip! Don’t just test your website yourself. You will be blind to some of its faults. Plus, you know how your site is supposed to work, so while you might find navigating it easy that’s not to say a stranger will. Get a fresh perspective. Ask family members and friends to test your site and give feedback. If they’re anything like our family and friends they won’t be afraid of offering criticism.

If you're ready to get going, this guide will introduce you to the services and software that can get you started building your own website, even if you have no experience. Keep in mind, none of these tools will give you an idea for a winning website—that's on you. They also won't make you a web designer, a job that's distinct from building a site. Still, these services and software will ease some of the headaches that come from a lack of extensive expertise in CSS, FTP, HTML, and PHP.
By this point, you’ve customized your site’s template and added some solid images and pages. But if your site still feels a little plain, there’s no need to worry – adding some exciting bells and whistles is a lot easier than it seems. Wix’s App Market has over 250 amazing applications to boost your site, and they cover everything from restaurant orders to interactive quizzes. The apps don’t just look great, either – they also provide your website with the modern interface necessary to stay competitive.
If you're ready to get going, this guide will introduce you to the services and software that can get you started building your own website, even if you have no experience. Keep in mind, none of these tools will give you an idea for a winning website—that's on you. They also won't make you a web designer, a job that's distinct from building a site. Still, these services and software will ease some of the headaches that come from a lack of extensive expertise in CSS, FTP, HTML, and PHP.
I'd like to express my thanks to Rob Mensching for creating the toolset in the first place, and to Neil Sleightholm, Vadym Stetsyak, Robert Pickering, Marc Borgers, John DeSoi, Markus Karg, Greg Glass, Stefan Krüger, Nobuo Kihara, Phil Wilson, Peter Tewkesbury, Nicholas Muguira, David Adams, Mike Green, Chesong Lee and Christophe Michel for the material contributed to the tutorial.
In an integrated application/setup development environment, the original developer should modify the WiX source files in sync with the application development. As soon as a new module has been started, a new registry entry, service or other dependency has been coded, the appropriate setup modification should be made in parallel. Using this approach, no important information will ever be lost and, as a bonus, the setup program will be practically finished together with the application itself.
This is not a huge factor in search engine rankings, but will help your users easily scan your content and find the keywords they are looking for. You should use bolding and bullet points to set apart words in the text, and this further tells the engines what is important on the page. Don’t go wild or you’ll end up cluttering up your page and aggravating the user.

Hi Osi, Thanks for your comment! That's great you want to create a website to reach your readers - WordPress is certainly the most powerful platform, and is perfect if you want a totally customizable website. However, it's important to know that it also comes with more ongoing maintenance and can be a bit technical depending on how you approach it. So if you have time and technical confidence, then yes it would be a perfect choice! If you want something super quick and easy though, then you're better off with a website builder. If you want some alternatives to explore, I can also recommend Wix, which offers tons of creative freedom along with template designs specifically designed for writers like you! We have a Wix vs WordPress comparison if you want to see them compared side-by-side. Another alternative is Weebly, which has great SEO tools to help your website get found in Google. Here's our Weebly Review if you want to learn more! I hope this helps, and best of luck with your website! Lucy
Hi Mike! Thanks for your question, I'm happy to help out. WordPress is the best option if you want to carry out backend coding - it gives you total control and customization over your website. Some website builders do let you code (such as Squarespace, for example). You can add custom code to WordPress using a plugin - there's more limitations on this with website builders, although carrying on with the Squarespace example, you can still add custom code, code injection, etc. You can add client-side code into Squarespace sites, but not server-side code. So if you want more coding freedom I would recommend WordPress! I hope that's helped answer your question! Best - Lucy
Don’t publish shallow content. There is no magic word count for the exact amount of copy you should write for SEO content. But as far as best practices for SEO go, you should always aim to write at least 300 words. However, your content will be more likely to rank if it thoroughly fleshes out and explains a topic Click & Tweet! , which often can’t be done with just 300 words. So write as much as you need to cover your subject fully.

Customization on WordPress requires much more technical skill than it does with website builders. You’ll need to dive into the code to make the changes you want. If you’re comfortable with HTML, CSS, and Javascript (or looking to learn more about them), this shouldn’t be an obstacle. Just be wary. WordPress offers more control than website builders, but only to those equipped to use it.
In addition to this integration, providing basically nothing more but developer comfort, WiX offers another level of integration, far more advantageous than the first one: the integration of the setup development process with that of the application. Traditionally, setup programs were only written when the main application had already been finished; often even by different developers. This approach requires a tedious and error prone process of collecting information about all the resources making up the application. While the files themselves are usually obvious, registry entries, services and most forms of inter-resource dependencies are often hard to reconstruct in a later stage: if solid development documentation is lacking, the setup developers have to collect all pieces of information from the original developers or try to extract it from the source code.
This is not a huge factor in search engine rankings, but will help your users easily scan your content and find the keywords they are looking for. You should use bolding and bullet points to set apart words in the text, and this further tells the engines what is important on the page. Don’t go wild or you’ll end up cluttering up your page and aggravating the user.
For years Adobe Dreamweaver has been synonymous with web page creation. It's gone from being a creator of HTML pages in a WYSIWYG interface to being able to handle programming pages in Cold Fusion, JavaScript, PHP, and other formats. Its liquid layout lets you see how pages look at different browser and screen sizes—even on smartphones and tablets. It's about as code-heavy as you want it to be.

Stop whatever you're doing and ask yourself this simple question: "Do I need a website?" If your response was anything other than "yes," you need to think again. It doesn't matter if you're the head of a multinational corporation who employs thousands of people or a local mom-and-pop shop from around the way, you need a website to help potential customers find you online. If you have a business, failure to establish an online home is a failure to grow.
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